What Percentage of Onside Kicks Are Successful in the NFL?

Onside kicks are a crucial part of the game of football. But what percentage of onside kicks are successful in the NFL?

Onside Kicks in the NFL

In the National Football League, an onside kick is a kickoff deliberately kicked short in an attempt to retain possession of the ball by the kicking team after a score or at the start of a half. When the ball goes out of bounds foul of the receiving team, the kicking team may recover the ball and retain possession.

What is an onside kick?

An onside kick in football is a play where the kicking team tries to regain possession of the ball by kicking it toward their own side of the field. The main idea behind an onside kick is to catch the receiving team off guard and give the kicking team a chance to recover the ball before they have a chance to set up their defense.

Onside kicks are used in situations where the kicking team is trailing in the score and they need to get the ball back quickly in order to have a chance to win the game. They are also sometimes used at the end of halfs or games as a way to prevent the other team from getting any more points.

Onside kicks are usually not very successful, especially in the NFL where there are some very good athletes on both sides of the ball. The success rate for onside kicks in the NFL is around 10-20%.

When is an onside kick used?

Onside kicks are most commonly used late in the game when a team is behind and needs to score quickly to catch up. The team kicking off hopes to catch the receiving team by surprise and recover the ball before they have time to set up a proper return. Onside kicks can also be used early in the game as a way to gain possession of the ball. This is known as an “onside surprise.”

Onside kicks are illegal in most high school football leagues, so if you see one during a high school game, it’s probably because somebody forgot about the rule. In college football, onside kicks are allowed but must be announced to the other team before the play begins.

What is the purpose of an onside kick?

The purpose of an onside kick is to try and regain possession of the ball after scoring. It is typically used when the team that just scored is trailing late in the game and needs to make a quick stop on defense in order to have a chance to win.

Onside kicks are also used occasionally to start a half or after a safety. In these situations, the team kicking off believes it has a better chance of recovering an onside kick than its opponent does of driving the length of the field for a touchdown.

Onside Kick Success Rates

In the NFL, onside kicks are only successful about 10-15% of the time. This means that, if a team is behind by more than one score late in the game, they are unlikely to be able to regain possession of the ball and have a chance to score.

What is the success rate of onside kicks in the NFL?

According to Pro Football Reference, the onside kick success rate in the NFL has fluctuated between 20 and 30 percent over the past decade. In 2018, there were 49 onside kicks attempted and only 11 were successful, for a success rate of 22.4 percent.

There are a number of factors that can affect an onside kick’s chance for success, such as weather conditions, the quality of the opposing team’s special teams unit, and whether or not the kicking team has executed similar plays successfully earlier in the game.

What are some factors that affect the success rate of onside kicks?

There are a number of factors that affect the success rate of onside kicks in the NFL, including the type of kick used, the distance of the kick, the surface on which the game is being played, and the weather conditions. In general, onside kicks are more difficult to execute in wet or windy conditions.

What are some strategies for increasing the success rate of onside kicks?

The onside kick is a low-percentage play, but it can be a game-changer if executed properly. The key to a successful onside kick is catching the opposing team off guard. The best time to attempt an onside kick is when the opposing team least expects it—usually after your team scores to take the lead late in the game.

There are a few different ways to execute an onside kick, but the most common is the “pop-up” kick. To execute a pop-up kick, the kicker approachs the ball at a sharp angle and kicks it high into the air. The ball should travel 10-15 yards before coming down, giving your team time to recover it.

Another strategy for increasing the success rate of onside kicks is to use a “short hop” kick. This involves kicking the ball short and low, making it easy for your teammates to recover. Short hop kicks are often used in situations where there is not much time left on the clock and your team needs to recover the ball quickly.

Finally, you can also try an “onside squib” kick. This involves kicking the ball hard and low along the ground. The goal is to have the ball bounce unpredictably, making it difficult for the other team to recover. Onside squib kicks are often used when there is not much time left on the clock and your team needs to prevent the other team from getting good field position.

Onside Kick Rules

In order to successfully execute an onside kick, the kicking team must notify the officials of their intention to attempt an onside kick. Once this has been done, the kicking team must kick the ball within 10 yards of the spot where it was last touched by the receiving team. The ball must then travel more than 10 yards before being touched by the kicking team. If the kicking team fails to meet these requirements, it will be penalized.

What are the rules for onside kicks in the NFL?

A successful onside kick in the NFL results in the kicking team regaining possession of the football. There are a few key rules that must be followed in order for an onside kick to be considered legal:
-The ball must travel at least 10 yards before being touched by a member of the kicking team
-No more than two members of the kicking team can touch the ball before it is touched by a member of the receiving team
-The ball cannot be touched by a member of the receiving team until it has traveled 10 yards

If any of these rules are not followed, it will result in an illegal onside kick and the receiving team will automatically gain possession of the football.

How have the rules for onside kicks changed over time?

Onside kicks were once a staple of football strategy. A team that was trailing in the fourth quarter could attempt an onside kick to regain possession of the ball and have one last chance to score. However, over time, the rules governing onside kicks have changed to make them less effective, and as a result, they are now used much less often.

The following is a brief history of onside kick rules in the NFL:

-Until 1974, an onside kick could be attempted at any time during the game.
-In 1974, the rule was changed so that an onside kick could only be attempted during the last two minutes of each half.
-In 1994, the rule was changed again so that an onside kick could only be attempted during the last five minutes of the game.
-In 2009, the rule was changed so that an onside kick could only be attempted if the kicking team was behind by at least nine points.
-In 2017, the rule was changed so that an onside kick could only be attempted if the kicking team was behind by at least 15 points.

These changes have made onside kicks much less effective, and as a result, they are now used much less often. In fact, according to data from Pro Football Reference, there were just six successful onside kicks in 2017, compared to 20 in 2009 and 51 in 1994.

What are some proposed changes to the rules for onside kicks?

In the NFL, the rules for onside kicks are that the kicking team must have at least eight players on each side of the 50-yard line, and the receiving team must have at least four players on each side of their 40-yard line. The kicking team must also havetouchback protection in place. If any of these conditions are not met, then it is a false start and the down is replayed.

Under current rules, the kicking team can recover an onside kick as long as the ball travels 10 yards and is not caught by the receiving team before it hits the ground. If it does not travel 10 yards, or if it is caught by the receivingteam before it hits the ground, then it is a live ball and can be advanced by either team.

There have been several proposed changes to these rules in recent years. One proposal would allow the kicking team to recover an onside kick as long as it goes five yards and is not caught by the receiving team before it hits the ground. Another proposal would require that all players on the kicking team be lined up behind each other at time of kick, rather than allowing them to spread out across the field as they currently can. It is unclear if either of these proposed changes will be adopted in the future.

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