What Is A Money Line Bet In Nfl?

A Moneyline bet in the NFL is a bet on which team will win the game outright, regardless of the point spread.

Introduction

In American football, the moneyline bet is a wager on which team will win the game outright, regardless of point spreads. The moneyline is the amount of money that must be bet in order to win $100. Therefore, if you were to bet $100 on the Steelers to win their game against the Browns, and they won, you would be paid $200 (your original $100 bet plus $100 in winnings).

If you were to bet on the Browns to win, however, and they lost, you would simply lose your original $100 bet. Moneyline bets are usually only offered on full game wagers (not on individual quarters or halves) and typically have odds attached to them – meaning that you will not simply be betting on which team will win outright, but also how likely they are to win.

The favorite will typically have negative odds (e.g. -200), meaning that you would need to bet $200 in order to win $100, while the underdog will have positive odds (e.g. +300), meaning that a $100 bet would net you $300 if they were to pull off the upset.

What is a moneyline bet?

A moneyline bet is a wager on which team will win a given game. It doesn’t take point spreads into account, so if you bet on the favorite, you’ll need that team to win by more than the odds indicate. If you bet on the underdog, you’ll need that team to either win outright or lose by less than the odds indicate.

How do moneyline bets work?

The point spread is the most common bet when betting on football, but the moneyline can be a valuable addition to your sports betting arsenal. So how does a moneyline work?

In a moneyline bet, the sportsbook will set a line on each team in a particular game. The favorite will have a minus sign next to their odds, while the underdog will have a plus sign. For example, if the New England Patriots are playing the Buffalo Bills and are favored by 7 points, they would be listed as -7. If the Bills were considered the underdog, they would be +7.

If you bet on the Patriots -7, you need them to win by more than 7 points for you to win your bet. If you bet on the Bills +7, you need them to either lose by less than 7 points or win outright for you to win your bet.

How do I place a moneyline bet?

To place a moneyline bet, you simply pick a team to win straight up. This is the most common type of bet in football and basketball. The odds will usually be +100 or -100, meaning you either risk $100 to win $100 or $10 to win $10. If the team is -100, that means you need to bet $100 to win $10. If the team is +100, that means you need to bet $10 to win $100.

How do I calculate my winnings from a moneyline bet?

If you bet $100 on the Patriots to win outright and they do, you’ll win $200 (2.0 x your bet). If you bet $100 on the Jets to win outright and they do, you’ll win $440 (4.4 x your bet). All full game moneyline bets on an NFL game carry standard juice of -110.

Prop bets, live betting, and parlays usually have different juice from moneyline bets. So make sure you know what kind of bet you’re placing and check the juice before placing your wager.

What are the different types of moneyline bets?

There are three types of moneyline bets that you can make in NFL football:

-The favorite: A moneyline bet on the favorite requires you to lay odds. For example, if the Green Bay Packers are -350 to beat the Indianapolis Colts, you would need to risk $350 to win $100.

-The underdog: A moneyline bet on the underdog allows you to take odds. For example, if the Colts are +280 underdogs against the Packers, a $100 bet would win you $280.

-The Pick ‘Em: In a Pick ‘Em game, there is no favorite or underdog. Both teams are priced at -110, meaning you have to risk $110 to win $100 on either side.

Conclusion

In conclusion, a moneyline bet in football is a wager on which team will win the game outright. There is no point spread to worry about, so your team just needs to win the game. These bets can be found on the NFL moneyline at most online sportsbooks.

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