How Much Do NHL Equipment Managers Make?

How much money do NHL equipment managers make? We break down the salaries of equipment managers for all 31 teams.

Salaries of NHL Equipment Managers

The average salary for an NHL equipment manager is $58,000 per year. However, this number can vary depending on the team’s budget and the equipment manager’s experience. The most experienced and qualified equipment managers can make up to $100,000 per year.

Vary by team

NHL equipment managers are responsible for the day-to-day operation of their team’s equipment and locker room. They travel with the team and are in charge of setting up and maintaining the equipment for practices and games. They also handle all the laundry for the team, including practice and game jerseys, socks, and towels.

Equipment managers typically have a background in playing or working with sports equipment. They must have excellent organizational skills and be able to think on their feet. NHL equipment managers are paid a salary by their team, and the amount varies depending on the team’s budget and the manager’s experience.

Vary by position

This is a difficult question to answer due to the various positions that come with being an equipment manager for an NHL team. The three main positions are: head equipment manager, assistant equipment manager, and training staff equipment manager.
The salaries of these positions can vary depending on the team they work for, their previous experience, and their responsibilities.

The average salary for a head equipment manager is between $60,000 and $120,000 per year.
Assistant equipment managers typically make between $35,000 and $85,000 per year.
Those working in training staff positions make an average of $40,000 to $90,000 annually.

Duties of NHL Equipment Managers

NHL equipment managers are responsible for the care and maintenance of all the team’s equipment. This includes everything from skates and sticks to jerseys and gloves. They make sure that everything is in good condition and that the players have what they need for each game. Equipment managers also travel with the team and handle all the logistics of setting up and breaking down the locker room.

Laundry

NHL equipment managers are responsible for the care and maintenance of all the team’s equipment. This includes everything from the players’ skates and sticks to the team’s jerseys and socks. Equipment managers also handle all the laundry for the team, making sure everything is clean and ready to go for each game.

In addition to their day-to-day duties, NHL equipment managers also have to be prepared for any emergency that might come up. This could mean anything from repairing a broken skate blade in the middle of a game to finding a replacement jersey when one gets ripped during play.

NHL equipment managers are an important part of any team, and they are usually very well-compensated for their efforts. According to “The Hockey News”, the average salary for an NHL equipment manager is $60,000 per year.

Maintenance

One of the most important duties for NHL equipment managers is maintaining all of the team’s equipment. This includes making sure that all of the skates are sharpened properly, that the sticks are in good condition, and that all of the pads and other protective gear is in good repair. In addition, they must regularly clean all of the team’s jerseys and socks and make sure that they are free of any stains or rips.

Another key duty of NHL equipment managers is to pack and unpack all of the team’s gear for road trips. This includes packing everything into cases and bags, loading it onto the team bus or plane, and then unloading it at the hotel or arena. They must also keep track of all of the team’s equipment while on the road, as well as returning any rented or borrowed items to their respective owners.

NHL equipment managers also play a key role in outfitting new players. When a player is traded to a new team or signs a contract with an NHL club, the equipment manager is responsible for finding them all of the necessary gear and getting it fitted to their individual size and preferences. This can be a daunting task, as each player has their own specific requirements for things like skates, sticks, and gloves.

In addition to these duties, NHL equipment managers also often handle other tasks such as laundry, ordering food and drinks for the players, setting up practice drills, organizing team events, and serving as a liaison between the players and coaching staff.

Inventory

One of the biggest duties of an NHL equipment manager is maintaining an inventory of all the team’s equipment. This includes keeping track of every stick, helmet, pair of skates, and piece of protective gear. It’s the equipment manager’s job to make sure that everything is in good repair and that there is enough of it to outfit the entire team.

NHL equipment managers also have to keep track of all the team’s uniform components, from jerseys and socks to pants and gloves. They have to make sure that each player has the right size and that there are enough of each item to go around. Additionally, they are responsible for keeping the team’s logo and colors consistent across all their gear.

Qualifications of NHL Equipment Managers

Most NHL equipment managers have a background in playing hockey. In fact, many of them played hockey at a high level before moving into equipment management. They often have a degree in athletic training or a related field. Equipment managers must be able to lift heavy equipment, skate, and have knowledge of the game of hockey. They must also be organized and able to keep track of inventory.

Education

An NHL equipment manager’s education requirements vary. Some may have a high school diploma or equivalent, while others may have a bachelor’s degree in business administration or a related field. Many of the larger NHL teams require their equipment managers to have a bachelor’s degree.

Experience

NHL equipment managers typically have several years of experience working in professional or collegiate hockey. Many equipment managers start out as interns or assistant equipment managers, working their way up through the ranks. Some equipment managers also have backgrounds as playing hockey at a professional or collegiate level. Equipment managers must have a strong knowledge of the game of hockey, as well as an understanding of the rules and regulations governing the sport.

Certification

Certification for equipment managers is not required by the NHL, but many equipment managers have certification through recognized associations, such as the National Athletic Trainers Association Board of Certification (NATABOC) or the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE). Equipment managers who are certified through these organizations may use the certified athletic trainer (ATC) or certified athletic trainer educational facility (CAATE) designation after their name.

Scroll to Top